Photo Gallery! African Wildlife Safari

Absolutely stunning wildlife roaming in the world famous Serengeti National Park, the Ngorongoro Crater, and the many other parks and reserves of Tanzania.

boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Leopard in the grass. Photo by Jarrad Seng. Boma Africa
giraffe boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Tarangire Sunrise. Photo by Jarrad Seng. Boma Africa
Eagleboma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife ngorongoro
Eagle takes flight in Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa
Dik Dik.boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife tarangire
Dik Dik. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa.
boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Mama & Baby. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa
Elephant, Tarangire boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Elephant, Tarangire National Park. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa
Hyena Ngorongoro boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Hyena takes her share. Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa

 

Crown Cranes boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife serengeti
Crown Cranes. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa
Zebras boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife serengeti
Zebras in the dust. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa

lioness boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife serengeti

Zebra lioness boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife serengeti
Zebra Hunt. Serengeti National Park. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa
Zebra Ngorongoro Crater boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Zebra Hunt in the Ngorongoro Crater. Photo by Andrew Knapp Boma Africa.
Zebra  Serengeti boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Zebra Hunt. Serengeti National Park. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa
Zebra serengeti boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
Zebra Hunt. Serengeti National Park. Photo by Mare Eve Lord. Boma Africa
"Pumba" Warthog  boma africa safari tanzania kilimanjaro wildlife
“Pumba” Warthog. Photo by Andrew Knapp. Boma Africa

 


Tanzania’s Non- Profit Tour Co.!

Testimonial! Keri-Lyn, Canada, 2018

I stayed with Leesha and Lau and family on a 6 week trip through Tanzania. I’ve known Leesha for many years and it was wonderful to reunite with her in Mto Wa Mbu. They showed me around the village, introduced me to their community and I got to witness the passion and inspiration that lives in their entrepreneurial projects. I had such an incredible time in the village. The people are kind and welcoming, the scenery of the Rift Valley walls and Lake Mayanara stunning. I shared some art classes, visited the market regularly, enjoyed the local food and hit the dance floor for a little nightlife! I highly receommend connecting with Boma Africa. Mto Wa Mbu is the perfect place to set out for safari or take some time to relax and settle in and make some friends after travelling around. I hope to make it back one day!! Thank you for being such amazing hosts! xoxo

Keri-Lyn; Canada; 2018

boma africa ngorongoro tanzania non profit tourism serengeti kilimanjaro safari lion cub christmas travel adventure game drive wildlife

Have you ever seen a cashew nut tree?

I am in the South of Tanzania, just a 2 hour drive from the border of Mozambique.

The main tribe in this area came originally from Mozambique and is called Makonde. It is a matrilineal tribe, so children follow the maternal line and traditionally the man would move to the woman’s village. If he has several wives he would travel from village to village. Modern ‘work model” economy has changed life for this tribe and more and more women are dependant on men.

The main industry here is cashew nuts and Tanzania is known as one of the world’s best cashew producers. Unfortunately I am not here at the right time of year to see the beautiful cashew fruits but was completely shocked and amazed to see how cashews grow!  When they are ripe they just fall off the tree and the farmer harvests them from the ground.

They are quite expensive here, assuming due to the global price of cashews. Tanzanians do snack on them, but they aren’t a common ingredient in meals.